Weekend Webcast

Today marks the beginning of International Clown Week. It's the one week a year to really celebrate the joys of clowns! In honor of the week, check out this video on the beginnings of Cirque Du Soleil.

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Posted Saturday August 1, 2015 12:00pm

Introducing HeritageQuest Online

BPL Adds New Genealogy Database

Beauregard Parish Library is proud to bring patrons a new genealogy databse, HeritageQuest Online. We add it to our existing genealogy resource, World Vital Records to bring our patrons the best resources possible. Our subscription to HeritageQuest Online begins August 1st, and you can find both by clicking the Genealogy link at left.

HeritageQuest® Online is a comprehensive treasury of American genealogical sources—rich in unique primary sources, local and family histories, and finding aids.

18th Century or 20th Century. European or Native American. Farm or Factory. East Coast or West Coast. Where does your American past begin?

Discover the amazing history of you with HeritageQuest Online. It delivers an essential collection of genealogical and historical sources—with coverage dating back to the 1700s—that can help people find their ancestors and discover a place’s past.

The collection consists of six core data sets:

  • U.S. Federal Censuses feature the original images of every extant federal census in the United States, from 1790 through 1940, slave, veteran, and non-population schedules, and more related content.
  • Genealogy and local history books provide more than 7 million digitized page images from over 28,000 family histories, local histories, and other books.
  • Revolutionary War records provides access to the complete NARA Series M804 collection - Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, a collection of an estimated 83,000 application files from officers and enlisted men who served in the Revolutionary War in all branches of the American military: army, navy, and marines.
  • Freedman’s Bank Records, with more than 480,000 names of bank applicants, their dependents, and heirs from 1865–1874, offers valuable data that can provide important clues to tracing African American ancestors and researching the Reconstruction Era.

Links to the following content are also available to the following collections:

  • U.S. Congressional Serial Set records the memorials, petitions, private relief actions made to the U.S. Congress back to 1789, with a total of more than 480,000 pages of information.
  • Periodical Source Index Archive published by the Allen County Public Library, is recognized as the most comprehensive index of genealogy and local history periodicals. It contains more than 2.3 million records covering titles published around the world since 1800.

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Posted Friday July 31, 2015 12:00pm

Find It Fridays

Tips for searching by Keyword in the library's online catalog:

Keyword searching is similar to the search you would perform using Google or Amazon, where you would enter a single word or simple phrase into the search field. Searching by keyword will give more, and sometimes less relevant results than searching by subject. The database will search for your entry anywhere in the material’s record (title, author name, subject headings, etc.).

For example: if you keyword search “Tiger” your results would contain materials written about the LSU Tiger's, non-fiction books written about tigers, or even the children's series "Kipper" written by Mark Inkpen where the main character is best friends with a tiger. Each of these results have different subject matters but because they contain the keyword "tiger" somewhere in the record it is considered a match.

When to use a Keyword search:

When you are unsure of the exact title of a book, video, CD, etc., but think you know a word or two.

When you aren't sure what subject heading to use.

When you want to broaden your search and find more items than you found with a title or subject search.

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Posted Friday July 31, 2015 09:00am

Just Arrived

Many of our patrons require or simply prefer large print books. If you are one of those people and you like to keep up with the current bestselling novels, you are in luck! The library receives many of the titles on the major bestseller lists, including the popular New York Times list, in large print format.

Check out these books that are on this weeks’s list:

Code of Conduct by Brad Thor. When four seconds of video is captured and anonymously transmitted to Washington, D.C., counterterrorism operative Scot Harvath is given the assignment of taking on one of the world’s most secret and powerful organizations and their devastating agenda. His investigation becomes a globe-spanning drama of international intrigue and political gamesmanship. It will be the deadliest assignment of his career.

Nemesis by Catherine Coulter. Special Agent Lacey Sherlock foils a terrorist attack at JFK and then turns the investigation over to the New York FBI. But another plot unfolds when a bomb threat at St. Patrick’s Cathedral sets off a major panic in midtown Manhattan. Meanwhile, Dillon Savich is trying to track down a killer who uses others to do his bidding. Sherlock and Savich’s investigations intersect and they both must race against the clock to stop the madness before more lives are lost.

The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah. Set in France in 1939, this is the story of Vianne Mauriac, whose husband has left to fight at the Front. She does not believe the Nazis will invade, but soon the streets are full of marching soldiers and caravans of trucks and tanks. Planes fill the skies and drop bombs on the innocent. When a German captain requisitions Vianne's home, she and her daughter must live with the enemy or lose everything. Without food or money or hope, as danger escalates all around them, she is forced to make one impossible choice after another to keep her family alive.

To find these books, and many other new large print selections, look for a green dot on the spine of the book. Also remember that after the books are not considered “new”, they will be shelved in the separate large print fiction section. Happy reading!

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Posted Thursday July 30, 2015 09:30am

Staff Picks

With Staff Picks, we would like to offer recommendations from our staff to you. These picks will be from a variety of reading, listening or viewing tastes. You might find stuff you've checked out before, or you might be intrigued enough to find a new favorite.

The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths are Solving America's Coldest Cases by Deborah Halber

The Skeleton Crew : How Amateur Sleuths are Solving America's Coldest Cases written by Deborah Halber is a very interesting look into the weird and wild world of web sleuths. Are you interested in helping to solve cold cases from the comfort of your living room? In America today, more than 40,000 people are dead & unaccounted for. The remains of these missing persons are stored sometimes for years in the back rooms of county morgues and coroner's facilities. They are waiting for someone to piece together the evidence that can link their body to a name. These unidentified victims have been adopted by a new breed of sleuths, civilians armed with an Internet connection & a passion for cold cases. If this sounds interesting, check this book out.

If this book interests you, feel free to request and check it out. We'll be back next Wednesday with a different Staff Pick.

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Posted Wednesday July 29, 2015 11:30am

Tech Tips

Just a reminder for all of our Microsoft Windows users out there that Windows 10 officially releases tomorrow. If you have Windows 7 or above the upgrade to Windows 10 will be free. This is a big departure from the way Microsoft has been known to do things so don't miss your chance if you are a Windows user and go ahead and grab the upgrade tomorrow! We will be back next week with another Tech Tip.

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Posted Tuesday July 28, 2015 12:00pm

Mango Monday: Italian

Italian

For this week's Mango Monday we will present Italian.

Italian is in the Romance language group with French and Spanish. For many, Italian is the language of food, history and culture. Mango creators write:

There is something special and unique about Italian culture and language. Bits and pieces of this language are deeply interwoven throughout our own culture, and they pop up in everyday life. From Italian cars and fashion to wonderful cuisine, everybody has a soft spot for this rich and passionate culture.

Classically trained singers often start with Italian as the first foreign language because of its sound lends itself easy to singing long, pure vowels. Italian is considered a relatively easy one for a native English speaker to learn. Italian also has the benefit as most other European languages of using the Latin alphabet, so a new learner won't have to learn an entirely new script to read it.

If you thought Italian was confined only to Italy, you'd be wrong! Italian has 195 million native speakers in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City, Malta, Slovenia, Croatia, Eritrea, Somalia, and France, especially Corsica. That does not include all the speakers in countries around the world who have learned Italian as their family's heritage language.

All conversational languages give you different language skills and situations to practice (Making Friends, Shopping, etc). Mango's Italian course has a few extra lessons that make it extra special. Here is the first lesson about describing things and events you can learn from Horse Race in Siena, Italy.

  • Quick! The pageant starts! Veloce! Inizia il corteo storico!
  • Oh gosh, how beautiful are the flag-wavers' costumes. They are all different. Oh cavoli, che belli i costumi degli sbandieratori! Sono tutti diversi!
  • And how great are the drummers! E che bravi i tamburini!
  • Now the race starts! Adesso parte la corsa!
  • Oh, no. It's a false start! Ah no, è una falsa partenza!
  • Now they have started for real. Let's see who wins! Ora sono partiti sul serio! Mo vediamo chi vince!
  • The ward of the Goose won! Ha vinto la contrada dell'Oca!

    Finnish is available through both Mango Languages and Pronunciator. Each language product has different interfaces, and some will work better for you depending on what you want to get out of your language experience. Don't forget to take advantage of each product's mobile apps for language learning on the go!

    Next Monday we will be back with a new language you can teach yourself with resources from your library.

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Posted Monday July 27, 2015 09:00am

Sunday School: Fashion Forward

Fashion Forward

We have previously visited other clothing-related topics in Sunday School, but ith this week's edition of Sunday School with Universal Class we will concentrate on fashion and clothing topics. Classes available through Universal Class are free to patrons who hold Beauregard Parish library cards.

Here are some sample courses you might consider taking, but there are many others are available. The descriptions are shortened, but there is more detail at Universal Class.

Fashion Design 101: An Introduction
"Fashion Design 101 explains the qualities and skills necessary to become a fashion designer. You'll learn about the many related career opportunities available besides that of fashion design and gain an inside look into today's fashion business. This course is ideal for students, seamstresses and anyone interested in the fashion business and design quality. Since a fashion designer wears many hats, you will gain knowledge about everything from haut couture to budget clothing and that design is about performing research, applying knowledge of fabric, coordinating color and texture, and monitoring quality and fit."
[11 lessons]
Knitting 101
"This course is designed to teach beginners the basics of knitting but it is also useful to those knitters that might need a refresher class. Whether you have just a little or no knowledge of knitting – this course is for you. Eleven lessons provide history, discussion of the tools, how to read and understand patterns and color charts, and of course how to start knitting. This course will finish up with some simple knitting projects to practice and complete. Written instructions, pictures and video demonstrations will help teach the knitting process. Consistent knitting lingo is used throughout, so there is no need to re-learn your lessons each time. This makes it easier and more fun for you to learn to knit."
[11 lessons]
Sewing 101
"Sewing your own garments is really not as difficult as it may sound. This course will take you through the very basic elements of fabric choice, how to decipher the pattern envelope and instructions inside, getting to know your sewing machine and how to begin expanding your wardrobe by sewing your own clothing, or clothing for your family."
[15 lessons]

There are over 500 different courses available. If these are not to your interest, log in to Universal Class. You're bound to find something you like!

If you need a reminder of how Universal Class works, please click this introductory post.

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Posted Sunday July 26, 2015 12:00pm

Weekend Webcast

Today is the National Day of the Cowboy! Today we pay homage to our cowboy and pioneer heritage as well as all those cowboys out there right now! In honor of the day check out this video on some of the things cowboys did to get their jobs done.

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Posted Saturday July 25, 2015 12:00pm

Find It Fridays

Using the Advanced Search to search by Subject:

Searching by Subject: Need to get that report on tree frogs done? Or looking for books about remodeling your house? When you need materials on a specific subject it is a good idea to first start at the Advanced Search screen. Once at the Advanced Search screen you will use the middle column drop down menus and select subject.

Searching by subject will give you a narrow set of relevant search results. The subject search uses a specific, controlled vocabulary (subject "headings") for describing library materials. The subject headings are set by the Library of Congress and they use specific terms to describe a subject. For example: You would want to use the term "cookery" instead of "cookbooks" or "cooking". For a full listing of the Library of Congress Subject Headings view this link: Library of Congress Subject Headings. Remember, you can always ask a librarian for help if you need some assistance searching the catalog!

What happens if you don’t find what you’re looking for when searching by subject? Stay tuned next week for tips on searching by Keyword, which will often give you a wider set of results.

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Posted Friday July 24, 2015 09:00am

Just Arrived

Most of us are familiar with the award-winning classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Until recently, this was the only novel written by author Harper Lee. The unexpected discovery of another book, written decades ago, led to the highly anticipated publication of Go Set a Watchman. This has been called a sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird because it focuses on the character Scout as an adult. In reality, it is a first draft of To Kill a Mockingbird. When it was first presented to the publishers, Lee was told to rewrite the story using Scout’s flashbacks of her childhood. She did so, and a classic was born.

Now the original story has been published and it has created quite a stir. The first printing is 2 million copies and it has set sales records.

This week the library received our copy on audio CD. Our print copy has not arrived yet, but will hopefully be on the shelves soon. We also have this title available in electronic format, both as an eBook and eAudio.

If you have questions about using our electronic library, or you wish to request the print book or audio, just check with any of our helpful library staff.

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Posted Thursday July 23, 2015 09:00am

Staff Picks

With Staff Picks, we would like to offer recommendations from our staff to you. These picks will be from a variety of reading, listening or viewing tastes. You might find stuff you've checked out before, or you might be intrigued enough to find a new favorite.

Kingdom of Ice by Hampton Sides

In the Kingdom of Ice by Hampton Sides is the true story of the crew of the USS Jeannette, an American ship that set sail on July 8, 1979 in hopes of breaking through the polar ice caps and finding the North Pole. Funded by the wealthy owner of The New York Herald, James Gordon Bennett Jr., the expedition was commanded by a young naval officer named George Washington De Long. De Long and his carefully picked crew of thirty-two men set off on a challenging voyage that would test each of them over the next four years.

In this book Hampton Sides recounts one of the greatest and most harrowing adventures of all time. He includes excerpts from De Long’s personal journal with details of the days spent locked in ice, the sinking of the Jeannette, and the harrowing march across an ice pack to reach Siberia. Sides also includes letters written by Emma De Long, which she titles “letters to nowhere” because she has little hope of the letters ever reaching her husband. This is a book that captures the emotions of readers and makes them think back to a time when so much of the world was uninhabited and unknown.

If this bookinterests you, feel free to request it and check it out. We'll be back next Wednesday with a different Staff Pick.

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Posted Wednesday July 22, 2015 09:00am

Tech Tips

Today a couple of reminders about our large copy/print machine in the Deridder branch. If you see your job and it says resources required next to it, that means it doesn't have the correct paper for your job. Delete that print and try again, making sure you send your print to the right paper tray.

If you print from a laptop your name will appear as Web User. You will need to check the document name to make sure that it is your print. If you print from the microfilm machine your name will appear as BP Library. Since only one person is using that machine at a time you can be reasonably sure that is your print, but you should always check to make sure it is correct as it may be left over from an earlier use of the machine.

If you have any other questions about printing or copying please feel free to ask. We will be back next week with another Tech Tip.

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Posted Tuesday July 21, 2015 12:00pm

Mango Monday: Farsi

Farsi (Persian)

For this week's Mango Monday we will present Farsi, aka modern Persian, is spoken by as many as 134 million speakers mostly in Iran. Farsi is in the same Indo-European language family as English, so some words have a common origin and still sound it. Unlike English, Farsi is written with a different script. Don't let that bother you. Mango will get you speaking right away, and if you want to learn how to read and write Farsi, check out the content available through Pronunciator.

Mango describes these possible uses for your Farsi skills:

Haggle for crafts at the Bazaar of Tehran, explore Iran from the Azadi Tower, or visit the jeweled city of Isfahan. Wander through Naqsh-e Jahan and see the Palace of Ali Qapu, then visit the Mosque of the Shaykh Lotfollah and marvel at one of the most stunning architectural feats of the Islamic world. Travel back to the Persian Empire at Persepolis and roam the magnificent ruins of the ancient palace. Wind down with a refreshing glass of doogh and use your language skills to delve into the poetry of Sohrab Sepehri or catch a play at the Tehran City Theater.

All conversational languages give you different language skills and situations to practice (Making Friends, Shopping, etc). Here is the first lesson about directions you can learn from Chapter 4: Where is the Restaurant. Please note below that the example phrases are transliterated with Latin alphabet characters.

  • Excuse me. behBAHKsheed
  • I got lost. man gom shoDAHM
  • Where is the restaurant? restoorAHN koJAHST
  • It's very far. KHEYlee door ast
  • Where is it on the map? ROOHye NAKsheh koAHST
  • Straight ahead and then to the right. mostaKEEM joLO va ba'id SAHMte rahst
  • Thanks, you did me a favor. MERsee lotf karDEED

    Farsi (Persian) is available through both Mango Languages and Pronunciator. Each language product has different interfaces, and some will work better for you depending on what you want to get out of your language experience. Don't forget to take advantage of each product's mobile apps for language learning on the go!

    Next Monday we will be back with a new language you can teach yourself with resources from your library.

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Posted Monday July 20, 2015 09:00am

Sunday School: Personal Care

Personal Care

There are many ways to take care of yourself and many classes on the topic available for free through Universal Class. With this edition of Sunday School with Universal Class we will give you just a few classes on personal care that might interest you as we work our way through teh summer. Classes available through Universal Class are free to patrons who hold Beauregard Parish library cards.

Here are some sample courses you might consider taking, but there are many others are available. The descriptions are shortened, but there is more detail at Universal Class.

The Art of Breathing 101
"We are all born masters in The Art of Breathing. For a variety of reasons, during the course of our lives, we start unlearning the good habits, and begin to increasingly soak up a number of bad habits, which are physical, mental and emotional. The Art of Breathing will teach you how to regain control over your breathing, which in turn will give you ownership of your body, thoughts and feelings. This will not only affect your own personal life, but will trigger positive changes in those around you."
[12 lessons]
Confidence Building 101
"This course on building self-confidence reaches beyond the standard self-help program by addressing the core issues surrounding confidence problems and exploring how to reprogram our brain‘s negative self-talk. This course delves into crafting succinct, personalized affirmations as well as visualization techniques for reframing the self-concept. Confidence busters, such as procrastination and cognitive dissonance are discussed at length, as well as the healing associated with forgiveness and service to others."
[11 lessons]
How to Manicure
"The practice of manicuring is a worldwide fashion statement. If you're putting a chunk of your paycheck into beauty products, manicures and pedicures, you may want to save precious dollars by learning to do your own mani-pedi. How to Manicure gives comprehensive information about keeping natural nails healthy and beautiful, and all the essentials about the chemistry, application and care of artificial nails."
[11 lessons]
Personality Development 101
"In this Personality Development course you will learn in-depth information about personalities. You will gain a better understanding about those around you and also more about who you are and how you got to be that way. With this course you can literally stop wondering about why you or someone you know behaves in a particular way. By the time you complete this course you will know how someone's personality develops and how that information can be useful."
[15 lessons]

There are over 500 different courses available. If these are not to your interest, log in to Universal Class. You're bound to find something you like!

If you need a reminder of how Universal Class works, please click this introductory post.

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Posted Sunday July 19, 2015 12:00pm

Weekend Webcast

Today is Mandela Day. It is a day to not only celebrate the accomplishments of Mr. Mandela but also a day for people around the world to recognize the power they hold as an individual and their own capacity to make change, not only in their own community but worldwide. In celebration of this take a look at this town hall meeting with Nelson Mandela.

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Posted Saturday July 18, 2015 12:00pm

Fields Branch Early Closure

Our Fields branch will be closing at noon today due to unforeseen complications with our air conditioning unit. We apologize for any inconvenience.

If you need to return items, we have a drop box available near the north gate of the Hyatt complex. If you need any other library services today, our DeRidder branch will be open regular hours until 5:30, and all branches of the library will be open regularly scheduled hours on Saturday.

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Posted Friday July 17, 2015 11:45am

Find It Fridays

This week's Find It Friday tip covers how to search by author using the Advanced Search page of the library's online catalog:

Searching by Author: Have a favorite author, but don’t know what else he/she writes? Use this search function when you want to see all items that the library owns by a certain author. The best way to do this is by selecting the author option from the drop down menu of the Advanced Search page and entering the author's last name, followed by the first name. For example: Grisham, John.

Even if you don’t know the first name of the author you can search by last name only and the catalog will still search for materials written about or by that individual. However, be aware that when you use this search option it is possible to receive results from many different authors who have the same last name.

Stay tuned next week when we learn to search by subject!

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Posted Friday July 17, 2015 09:00am

Just Arrived

Summer vacation is a good time to sit back and relax with a good mystery story. The library has all types of mysteries, but this week we received several that will tempt your taste buds as well as keep you guessing the identity of the culprit.

Check out these culinary mysteries.

Butter off Dead: A Food Lover’s Village Mystery by Leslie Budewitz. Erin Murphy, the manager of a specialty local foods market, is organizing the First Annual Food Lovers’ Film Festival. But when her planning partner is found dead only days before the festival, she suspects someone is attempting to stop the films from rolling. To make things worse, Erin’s brother is the top suspect. Convinced that he is innocent and determined that the show must go on, Erin must find the real killer. But the closer she gets the more likely it becomes that she will be the next victim.

Dead Men Don’t Eat Cookies: A Cookie Cutter Shop Mystery by Virginia Lowell. Olivia Greyson and the rest of the crew at The Gingerbread House can’t resist investigating when buried bones are found in the old house that Olivia’s mother is renovating. But they soon discover that digging up the secrets of the past can be deadly.

Death of an English Muffin: A Merry Muffin Mystery by Victoria Hamilton. Merry Wynter is trying to sell the family castle. But until a buyer can be found, she decides to take in renters. Several older women jump at the chance to live in a real castle. The Legion of Horrible Ladies, as Merry calls them, is led by the terribly nasty and wealthy Cleta Sanson. When Cleta is found murdered in an embarrassing fashion, behind a locked door, Merry knows that she must find the killer before another of her guests meets the same fate.

In addition to great stories, these books contain delicious recipes for treats featured in the mystery.

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Posted Thursday July 16, 2015 09:00am

FlashPlayer Errors

Rash of security exploits hitting Flash Player

If you have been wondering why Firefox is displaying errors on pages when you view a page with Flash content, it is because so many exploits have surfaced that Mozilla Corp has taken the extraordinary action of just blocking ALL flash even if the most recent version is installed. This isn't a problem we can fix and we aren't even sure we would want to 'fix' it if they are correct that several more 'zero day' exploits are coming soon.

You can override the block and allow Flash to display but you should only do so on a per site basis and only for sites you trust. YouTube, Vine and the really big Facebook games are probably safe but most other sites and EVERY ad server should be considered suspect until this mess blows over.

Stay safe out there....

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Posted Tuesday July 14, 2015 07:00pm
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